Study Spotlight: Noranda Earth Sciences Library

The view of the Noranda Earth Sciences Library from its second floor
The inside view of the Noranda Earth Sciences Library from its second floor

And.. we’re back with Study Spotlight! Last time I reviewed Knox College’s Caven Library ( check out the hyperlink!) For the second post, I’ll be reviewing the Noranda Earth Sciences Library located on 5 Bancroft Avenue.

Where is the Earth Sciences Library?

The Noranda Earth Sciences Library is a little gem situated on the second floor of the Earth Sciences Buildings. If you’re like me and know absolutely nothing about this area, it’s basically a collection of closely spaced buildings that all fall under the UofT code of ES (you may be familiar with ES 1050, the auditorium many first year courses are held in). Once you enter through the front doors, there’ll be a sign to direct you to the library through the next flight of stairs.

The Noranda Earth Sciences Library is also cornered between New College (that’s my college, holla!) and the McLennan Physical Laboratories.

Quietness: 8.1/10

For a library, it is quiet but it’s definitely not the most quiet library I’ve been to; there’s no harm in a library that isn’t completely silent though! I feel comfortable breathing, sneezing, coughing and occasionally whispering to my peers. A chill environment to be in.

Spot Availability: 8.6/10

Not a lot of students know about this little library so I can always count on there being a seat for me. There are both individual studying cubicles (on the second floor) as well as a number of group study tables (on the ground floor).

Resources (computer specific): 7/10

I’m not taking any courses in the Earth Sciences disciple so I haven’t (or will ever) use the books but there does seem to be a vast selection. There’s also a good amount of computers available for use which I have used previously. The computers are spaced enough so that each individual has their own space to take/annotate notes on a sheet of paper whilst using the computer.

Aesthetic: 8.3/10

The Noranda Earth Science Library definitely has that retro vibe to it with its dulled polychromatic colour scheme of purple and green. The floors are all carpeted and the furniture is made of a light-coloured wood. But there are two aspects of it that make the library visually appealing: the architecture and sunlight (see photo above).

The library is round with “two storeys”. So on the first floor, you have your computers and group study tables while on the second floor, you have your independent studying cubicles with a flight of stairs to bridge the two. The design creates a dynamic within this small library with the ground floor having a sound threshold higher than that of the second floor.

Because of the location and round design of the library, it is enveloped by a panel of windows allowing maximum sunlight to enter. Nothing’s better than a good dose of Vitamin D!

Overall: 8.2/10

The Noranda Earth Sciences Library is definitely one of my go-to libraries when I’m in the area. It may take a bit of time to initially find it, but it’s definitely worth it. A quiet secluded place to study.

For more information, visit

Bonus: the Earth Sciences building also has a green house open for student viewing!

RPFF E-Invite Fundraiser (med)

Regent Park Film Festival Annual Fundraising Screening

Come out and support Toronto’s only free multicultural film festival by attending our Annual Fundraising Screening, featuring a 2015 Hot Docs Film “Mom and Me”. A $50 ticket will include a cocktail reception, entertainment, film screening and more!

Mom and Me directed by Lena Macdonald and produced by Gordon Henderson and Lena Macdonald, is a personal and intimate documentary about a young filmmaker coming of age in extraordinary circumstances. It follows the complicated relationship between director Lena Macdonald and her mother, who was once a filmmaker herself, but ended up homeless, crack-addicted and on the streets. MOM and ME is about addiction, prostitution and despair but it is also a story about family, the power of hope and the tenacity of love.

For the trailer, go to

To purchase tickets go to:

Event Information:

Annual Fundraising Screening
October 22, 2015
6:30PM Cocktail Reception
8:00PM Film Screening & Panel
Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas Street East

Ticket Options:

  • Individual Ticket ($50)
  • Includes cocktail reception, entertainment, film screening and more!
  • Sponsor a Regent Park Youth ($50)
  • Buy a ticket for a Regent Park youth to attend the screening or participate in a Regent Park Film Festival workshop
  • Sponsor Ticket ($250)
  • Includes two individual tickets, festival merchandise and special recognition at the Film Festival

All tickets include a charitable tax receipt.

All proceeds go towards keeping the Festival and all our activities FREE!

Regent Park Film Festival Charitable Registration # 8459 14613 RR0001

Ticket Page:

Regent Park Film Festival website:

Zoltán Mága: From Budapest with Love Contest



October 31, 2015 • 3:00PM & 8:00PM

TICKETS & INFORMATION: / 416.408.0208

To win: be the first person to email stephaniew [at] glatzconcerts [dot] com. Send your name, mailing address & a synonym for “paprika”! The winner will be notified by email on October 19th by email. 

Live in concert, enjoy the flair and passion of Zoltán Mága, Hungary’s foremost violin virtuoso! Experience fiery music and Hungarian folk dance brought to life by a cast of hand-picked singers, costumed ballroom dancers and chamber symphony orchestra. From heart-warming ballads, beautiful waltzes and beloved arias to the furious speeds of Zoltán’s Gypsy band, let these performers dazzle you with their masterful virtuosity.
If you loved Zoltán’s PBS Special, From Budapest with Love, then you’ll love the charm of this vibrant live concert celebrating the infectious energy of Hungary’s music and dance!

Audiences adore Zoltán for his style, warmth and his beautiful artistry. He has been honored to play before kings, heads of state, church dignitaries and world-famous stars. With musicianship that shines through his repertoire of traditional Hungarian folk melodies and classical rhapsodies, Zoltán is a master of his instrument, continually searching for new ways to communicate with his audiences.

RECAP: U of T Receives $114 Million Grant for Regenerative Medicine

As you might have heard back in late July, our university has received a record-breaking amount of funding from the federal government in order to establish a groundbreaking centre for regenerative medicine. Now that it’s time again to begin school, a lot of students are asking, what exactly is this all about? Continue reading RECAP: U of T Receives $114 Million Grant for Regenerative Medicine

Advance Screening of HE NAMED ME MALALA


CINSSU Presents an advance screening of HE NAMED ME MALALA on October 1st at Innis Town Hall, 8pm!

For a chance to receive tickets, email with the subject code MALALA.

Synopsis: HE NAMED ME MALALA is an intimate portrait of Malala Yousafzai, who was wounded when Taliban gunmen opened fire on her and her friends’ school bus in Pakistan’s Swat Valley.

The then 15-year-old teenager, who had been targeted for speaking out on behalf of girls’ education in her region of Swat Valley in Pakistan, was shot in the head, sparking international media outrage. An educational activist in Pakistan, Yousafzai has since emerged as a leading campaigner for the rights of children worldwide and in December 2014, became the youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.

First-Year Anxieties

As a first year student, I’ve been experiencing a lot of anxieties from my transition from high school to university.  Some things have been especially tough since I’m a commuter and I don’t seem to blend into the social aspects of university life as easily as residence students do. Therefore, I want to write this article as a way to document my experience and see if I can come up with solutions to my own problems. Continue reading First-Year Anxieties

UC Follies’ AGAMEMNON Review

The UC Follies’ adaptation of Agamemnon held onto the core values of the original play. To quote the artistic producer, Agamemnon “explores gender and power”,  and incorporated the devotion to Greek gods and the seduction and destruction of war.

There is a clear disregard of a woman’s value throughout the play, especially between the chorus and the Queen, Clytemenstra. They honour her, but only in the King’s absence (a 10 year absence, and still they resent a woman in power). They say she’s “like wax, too easily softened”. Even the king, upon his return, says “A woman who fears nothing, is she a woman?” Well, to answer your question Agamemnon: hell yes.We think all women can relate to Clytemenstra with her sassy sarcastic adoration of her husband, and powerful defence of herself and her lost daughter (killed by her husband!). Continue reading UC Follies’ AGAMEMNON Review