Pulse 2016: All You Need to Know

“Mental health is tricky because its about really knowing who you are and being able to say that you need help in a surrounding where you think so many other people are stable.”-Sophia Shim

Needless to say, it takes a lot of courage to ask for help.

One of the most challenging parts of dealing with mental health is coming to terms with the fact that no one is invincible. On the outside, we may seem on top of everything, put together, ahead of the game and confident, but on the inside, no one knows how we truly are feeling. Coming to the realization that we must take care of our minds as much as we take care of our bodies is something that society has not come to terms with yet. We’ve seen the major changes that things like the introduction of the Health & Wellness centre at the University of Toronto, as well as the addition of Mental Health Awareness Month – and it’s about time. More and more students seem to catching on to the progress that the university has made. “On campus there are many options if you are in need of help, whether it be provided by your college or UofT as a whole”, says second year student, Sophia Shim.

One initiative, founded by Joanna Huang and Michael Bray of the University of Toronto aims to create a sense of community in the Toronto student population and encourage discussion about mental health in the GTA. Pulse, founded in 2013, has fundraised for three years to bring attention and create a positive space for discussing mental health in our community. “There is nothing I am more passionate about as I am mental health. It’s an issue that touches the lives of everybody, in one way or another.”, says Joanna, “The entire topic is muffled. It’s blanketed by a thick layer of societal stigma, and completely devalued. People don’t talk about it. I’ve struggled with my own mental health, and I find it very difficult to talk about. But I have no trouble talking about a sprained foot, so why should this be any different?”

Since it’s founding, Pulse has been partnered with Oolagen, a Toronto based organization who’s mission is to “listen, engage, assist, and empower young people to recognize their own strength and values”. Located on 65 Wellesley Street East, Oolagen provides counselling services for all ages and provide residential homes for people aged 14-18. Oolagen also provides on site school support in for three different Toronto high schools, giving students access to mental health services when they cannot otherwise. “[Ooolagen is] also planning to expand their services to cover university-aged youth”, says University of Toronto Pre-Medical co-president Alissa Mirochnitchenko. The Pre-Medical Society is partnered with Pulse as one of their main supporters on campus.

www.pulsetoronto,com
Pulse is on the 18th – get your tickets at www.pulsetoronto.com

Both Oolagen and Pulse are promoting mental health and discussion to Toronto, and have been gaining momentum ever since their start. “Pulse 2015 has raised over $2000.00 for Oolagen… This year, we will strive to surpass our previous earnings and continue to further increase awareness for mental health!” says Pre-Medical Society Co-President Victoria Malysmiuk. On March 18, Pulse and Oolagen are partnering again to bring an amazing fundraiser to Orchid Nightclub. As the campaign’s slogan states, “Good music. Good company. Good cause”, it’s sure to be a fun evening for an important charity. “We hope that our annual fundraiser, Pulse, remains a reminder for individuals to critically think about their own mental health and seek help if they feel out of balance.” Says Victoria and Alissa.“I think that my biggest goal this year was to make the discourse around mental health positive- we are all students and we all understand that university can be physically, mentally and emotionally draining at times. In my eyes, events like PULSE are important because it brings students together to have positive, happy experiences.”

Additional information about Pulse, Oolagen, and this year’s charity fundraiser can be found at the following sites:

www.pulsetoronto.com

https://www.facebook.com/events/1537362533224023/

http://oolagen.org/

We hope to see you on the 18th!

Study Spotlight: Noranda Earth Sciences Library

The view of the Noranda Earth Sciences Library from its second floor
The inside view of the Noranda Earth Sciences Library from its second floor

And.. we’re back with Study Spotlight! Last time I reviewed Knox College’s Caven Library ( check out the hyperlink!) For the second post, I’ll be reviewing the Noranda Earth Sciences Library located on 5 Bancroft Avenue.

Where is the Earth Sciences Library?

The Noranda Earth Sciences Library is a little gem situated on the second floor of the Earth Sciences Buildings. If you’re like me and know absolutely nothing about this area, it’s basically a collection of closely spaced buildings that all fall under the UofT code of ES (you may be familiar with ES 1050, the auditorium many first year courses are held in). Once you enter through the front doors, there’ll be a sign to direct you to the library through the next flight of stairs.

The Noranda Earth Sciences Library is also cornered between New College (that’s my college, holla!) and the McLennan Physical Laboratories.

Quietness: 8.1/10

For a library, it is quiet but it’s definitely not the most quiet library I’ve been to; there’s no harm in a library that isn’t completely silent though! I feel comfortable breathing, sneezing, coughing and occasionally whispering to my peers. A chill environment to be in.

Spot Availability: 8.6/10

Not a lot of students know about this little library so I can always count on there being a seat for me. There are both individual studying cubicles (on the second floor) as well as a number of group study tables (on the ground floor).

Resources (computer specific): 7/10

I’m not taking any courses in the Earth Sciences disciple so I haven’t (or will ever) use the books but there does seem to be a vast selection. There’s also a good amount of computers available for use which I have used previously. The computers are spaced enough so that each individual has their own space to take/annotate notes on a sheet of paper whilst using the computer.

Aesthetic: 8.3/10

The Noranda Earth Science Library definitely has that retro vibe to it with its dulled polychromatic colour scheme of purple and green. The floors are all carpeted and the furniture is made of a light-coloured wood. But there are two aspects of it that make the library visually appealing: the architecture and sunlight (see photo above).

The library is round with “two storeys”. So on the first floor, you have your computers and group study tables while on the second floor, you have your independent studying cubicles with a flight of stairs to bridge the two. The design creates a dynamic within this small library with the ground floor having a sound threshold higher than that of the second floor.

Because of the location and round design of the library, it is enveloped by a panel of windows allowing maximum sunlight to enter. Nothing’s better than a good dose of Vitamin D!

Overall: 8.2/10

The Noranda Earth Sciences Library is definitely one of my go-to libraries when I’m in the area. It may take a bit of time to initially find it, but it’s definitely worth it. A quiet secluded place to study.

For more information, visit https://earth.library.utoronto.ca

Bonus: the Earth Sciences building also has a green house open for student viewing!

RECAP: U of T Receives $114 Million Grant for Regenerative Medicine

As you might have heard back in late July, our university has received a record-breaking amount of funding from the federal government in order to establish a groundbreaking centre for regenerative medicine. Now that it’s time again to begin school, a lot of students are asking, what exactly is this all about? Continue reading “RECAP: U of T Receives $114 Million Grant for Regenerative Medicine”

Study Spotlight: Knox College’s Caven Library

classic photo of Knox College Walkway
A classic photo of the beautiful outdoor walkway at Knox College (59 St. George Street)

Introducing… Study Spotlight! Study Spotlight is a newly established series of blog posts focusing on different places to study. For the first post, I’ll be personally reviewing Knox College’s Caven Library.

What is Knox College?

Knox College runs from King’s College Circle to St. George Street, having entrances/exits to both. In a nut shell, it isn’t like the 7 other colleges offered at U of T. Although there are some graduate students affiliated with Knox, I can say there are no undergraduate students that are tied to it. Big difference already, right? Knox is also much smaller in size and resources: there’s a small kitchen for eating, and located upstairs is a small church and the library. To the left and right of the beautiful walkway photographed above, there are courtyards with benches and flowers.

Quietness: 9.2/10

It’s incredibly quiet. Each time I come back, I feel guilty for pulling the zippers on my backpack, pencil and tablet case. There’s little whispering and the noise from outside doesn’t find its way in. The library itself is pretty small so there aren’t any doors for people to constantly open and close. The entire college is actually pretty quiet thanks to the silence-enforcing admins.

Spot Availability: 8.7/10

The library isn’t very packed. I guess it has a a lot to do with the fact that not a lot of people know about this gem. Out of the many times I’ve visited, I can always find a spot. Seats are organized in trios with a couple of the larger study group tables situated near the front desk.

Resources: ??

I’ve never used any of the library’s resources except for their WiFi. There seems to be a lot of books, but all probably specific to the graduate programs they offer at Knox. There are also a couple of computers for use; probably about nine.

Aesthetic: 8.5/10

If the above photo wasn’t enough to make you like Knox, maybe this will help:

KNOX2

The Caven Library has most of its furniture made of wood and the floors are all carpeted. The ceiling is raised high, with a set of chandeliers hanging. The lights definitely illuminate a warm cast on the library with little sunlight penetrating through the windows.

Overall: 8.7./10

As a life science student, Knox is a really convenient place for me to hang around. It’s close to where all my classes are: the convocation hall, medical sciences building, sid smith, etc. I can have lunch either in the walkway (if I can find a seat and it’s warm enough) or in their small kitchen. And of course, I can do my favourite thing there too: study!!!

For more information, visit http://www.knox.utoronto.ca/

Hilary Clinton vs Bernie Sanders: A Policy Guide

Your one-stop-shop article comparing the politics and policies of American Presidential candidates Hilary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

With files from politifact.com.

Hilary Clinton

  • Iraq War authorization– supported
  • Wall Street Bailout (TARP)– supported
  • Breaking Up Big Banks-n/a
  • Patriot Act 2001– supported
  • Patriot Act Re authorization 2006– supported
  • Foreign US Military Intervention– supports
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership– supports
  • Death penalty– supports
  • Keystone XL Pipeline– supports
  • 2006 Border Fence Legislation– supported
  • Offshore Oil Drilling– supports

Bernie Sanders

  • Iraq War authorization– opposed
  • Wall Street Bailout (TARP)– opposed
  • Breaking Up Big Banks-supports
  • Patriot Act 2001– opposed
  • Patriot Act Re authorization 2006– opposed
  • Foreign US Military Intervention– opposes
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership– opposes
  • Death penalty– opposes
  • Keystone XL Pipeline– opposes
  • 2006 Border Fence Legislation– opposed
  • Offshore Oil Drilling– opposes

Restoration of my faith in shawarma- Habeebee shawarma

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Snapchat--4469079729393747184

For all my arab friends out there, and all my non-arab, but arab-food-loving friends: I have been trying to find a decent shawarma and falafel place since I’ve landed in Canada, and I’m sure I’m not the only one. Many a times I’ve ordered a shawarma wrap, hoping to see the meat being shaved off the stack with a large knife or a small circular saw, dropped to a circular tray below, retrieved and placed into the familiar flat, arabic bread and finally decorated with a party of cucumber, onion, tomato, lettuce, eggplant, parsley, pickled turnips, pickled gherkins, pickles, rhubarb and cabbage.
What I do end up with, however, is a grilled chicken/meat sandwich where the chicken/meat is sliced up (decievingly) into shawarma-looking slices. As an arab, personally, I cannot emphasise enough on how much Toronto has ruined shawarma for me.

After months of trying fake shawarmas from random food places, getting disappointed (or worse; getting sick) I found a tiny fast-food restaurant that secretly hides behind the harbourfront theatre at 218 Queens Quay W- ‘Habeebee’s shawarma’, or, more commonly known as ‘Shawarma Guys’ is the ‘quick and good’ type, where the service is quick and the food is delicious. Located in the lower level of a retail space and kept out of sight by Pizza Pizza, Subway and Quiznos, the Shawarma Guys is a great alternative to your typical fast food.

Beef or chicken shawarmas will run you about $5, with falafel under $4. The meat is pretty good, and I would personally recommend avoiding the iceberg lettuce and cheap tomatoes. Instead, load them up with radishes, banana peppers, and Frank’s Red Hot for a tasty time.

There isn’t much room inside, but the food is worth it. I would reccommend getting yourself a shawarma or two, coupled with some of their mouth-watering poutines, and chilling with some friends at the Toronto Lake, playing Taboo or cards, watching people walk along with their dogs, or just enjoying the semi-good weather while it lasts.